Mar
3
Jun 25

Refracted Reality: Paintings by Michael Steinbrick

image: Michael Steinbrick, Young American, 2016, oil on linen, 38" x 28"

image: Michael Steinbrick, Young American, 2016, oil on linen, 38" x 28"

SILVERMAN

and

The Majestic Theatre Condominium Association

presents:

Refracted Reality: Paintings by Michael Steinbrick

March 3rd 2017 – June 25th 2017

Opening Reception: Friday March 3rd 6-8pm

(Part of JC Fridays)

The Majestic Theatre Condominiums

222 Montgomery Street

Jersey City, NJ 07302

201.435.8000

 

SILVERMAN and The Majestic Theatre Condominium Association presents: Refracted Reality: Paintings by Michael Steinbrick, curated by Enrico Gomez

 

Michael Steinbrick is an emerging artist in the Photorealist painting tradition. Offering works from his New York Stories and New York Reflections Series, Mr. Steinbrick engages the viewer with large-scale painted fragments of the urban landscape; at once as recognizably familiar and specifically unique as the ever changing moments in New York City life. The genre of Photorealism emerged as an extension of the interest in Pop Art and in some ways, as a rebuttal to the tenets of Abstract Expressionism, the prevailing esoteric norm within painting at that time. Artist champions of Photorealism used photography as a collaborative tool in the creation of their dazzling works. What emerged was something greater than mere documentation (which, of course, was no longer needed due to the supremacy of the camera for these purposes). No, what artists like Audrey Flack, Richard Estes, and Chuck Close brought through the genre of Photorealism was a sort of presaging of the digital age, wherein visual and other information is routinely reduced and broken down into it’s primary components, and then reassembled along systemic and ofttimes arbitrary lines. Bits of visual data fill the painted frame, evincing a Pollock-like proclivity toward teeming, all over compositions, yet retaining space for artistic license and aesthetic agency.

 

It is in this strong yet composed sense of directorial decision making that we begin to identify the keen hand and heightened sensibilities of painter Michael Steinbrick. In his New York Reflections Series, we witness dense tableaus from Manhattan’s Times Square and Midtown neighborhoods. Vehicular clusters and pedestrians pepper the scenes amidst the canyon walls of a gleaming city.  The series is rife with visual stimulus and reflected light, a progression of generous works that reward the patient viewer by evolving and slowly revealing their many gem-like peculiarities. Seemingly random echoes between the similar colors of billboards and the traffic below, for example, highlight certain formal strategies. In Steinbrick’s created world, a golden sunset is received and repeated against the darkening façade of city streets, messages blared from electronic billboards find clever rebuttals from the chance configurations of the humans beneath them.

 

One of the artist’s stated goals when composing these paintings is to remain open and receptive to the chance and “coincidental” aspects of their constructions; happy accidents and juxtapositions that are perhaps vibrational cues and, in the artists words, “… symbolism, orchestrated on a higher level of consciousness.” Steinbrick begins with a number of on-site observations and intuitive photographic documentation, availing himself to the additional or third “eye” of the camera and it’s unique contribution to the recorded scene. The conflation of these elements on canvas is then a sensitive process of translation into paint via hand and eye cooperation, instinct, judgment and personal flair.

 

The notion of a recomposition of variegated elements into an individual work is implicated in the title of the exhibition itself; Refracted Reality. Like sunlight refracted through a prism into it’s rainbow band of individual colors, the scenes in Steinbrick’s paintings are also a symphony of consonant yet disparate parts; buildings, pedestrians, urban flora, and traffic signs. The artist refers to the magic qualities within his pictorial tableaus as, “… fleeting moments when various elements come together to create a harmonious blending of shape, pattern, form, and color.”

 

Steinbrick counts among his heroes American Realist Edward Hopper, whose introspective and psychological landscapes captivate viewers to this day, as well as American Impressionist John Singer Sargent, whose bravura and panache with paint handling lent a sense of drama and a uniquely American penchant for showmanship to the Impressionist canon. These qualities and dispositions are readily traceable within Steinbrick’s paintings, while the final results can point to only one maker. The “eye of the tornado” paradoxical presence of both storm and serenity within Steinbrick’s works is vaguely reminiscent of the Pointillist quietude of Georges Seurat, while the narrative threads running throughout these paintings can harken as far back as to the Early Dutch masterworks of Jan Van Eyck and Willem Kalf. Their paintings, like Steinbrick’s, hold myriad objects, each object with a story, each story holding a lifetime of moments …  the artist even entitled one of his series, “New York Stories”, a collection of works that possess both chance and purposeful arrangements of characters and symbolism within their scenes. These paintings however, taken in total, perhaps reflect one additional character in an ongoing biopic of creative unfolding, the artist himself.

 

Lauded art historian Sir Ernst H. Grombrich writes, “Neither art nor nature is ever as smooth and cold as glass. Nature reflected in art always reflects the artist’s own mind, his predilections, his enjoyments, and therefore his moods.” It is indeed possible to get a sense of Mr. Steinbrick’s aesthetic concerns through careful observation of his work. But like most great painting, this is but one of the many generous qualities which can be found within. These paintings signify so many aspects of the contemporary urban experience; cacophonous and melodic, chaotic and serene. Finally, like the Metropolis that inspired them, may these masterful works also encourage viewers to find themselves reflected in the multiple realities therein.

 

The exhibition will be on view at The Majestic through June 25th , 2017. For further information, please visit us at SILVERMAN or call number (201) 435-8000. The Majestic is located at 222 Montgomery Street in Jersey City, NJ.

 

“Refracted Reality: Paintings by Michael Steinbrick” is the fifth exhibition that artist/curator Enrico Gomez will organize for SILVERMAN. For additional information on the exhibiting artist Michael Steinbrick, please visit: michaelsteinbrick.com. For additional information on the curator, please visit: enricogomez.com and thedoradoproject.com.

 

SILVERMAN has presented the works of Jeanne Tremel, Eliot Markel, Debra Drexler, Mark Van Wagner, Rob Ventura, Robert Hendrickson, Sarah Becktle, Kati Vilim, Mark Dagley, Candy Le Sueur, Ed Fausty, Anna Mogilevsky, Ali Harrington, Sara Wolfe, Anne Percoco, Shauna Finn, Melanie Vote, Paul Lempa, Fanny Allié, Michael Meadors, John A. Patterson, Charlotte Becket, Roger Sayre, Karina Aguilera Skvirsky, Tom McGlynn, Margaret Murphy, Valeri Larko, Tenesh Webber, Glenn Garver, Jennifer Krause Chapeau, Michelle Doll, Tim Heins, Megan Maloy, Laurie Riccadonna, Thomas John Carlson, Tim Daly, Ann Flaherty, Scott Taylor, Jason Seder, Sara Wolfe, Beth Gilfilen, Andrzej Lech, Hiroshi Kumagai, Victoria Calabro, Asha Ganpat, Darren Jones, Ryan Roa, Laura Napier, Risa Puno, Nyugen E. Smith, Amanda Thackray, and Kai Vierstra.

(PATH Train to Grove St: PATH Trains from WTC, 33rd, 23rd, 14th, 9th, and Christopher St)

(PATH Train to Grove St: PATH Trains from WTC, 33rd, 23rd, 14th, 9th, and Christopher St)

May
10
Aug 27

An Unreliable Narrator: Paintings by Barbara Friedman

(image: Barbara Friedman, Gumby in Town Square, 2016, oil on linen, 44" x 42")

(image: Barbara Friedman, Gumby in Town Square, 2016, oil on linen, 44" x 42")

SILVERMAN

and

Hamilton Square Condominium Association

present:

 

An Unreliable Narrator: Paintings by Barbara Friedman

May 10th 2017 – August 27th 2017

 

Opening Reception: Wednesday May 10th 6-8pm

 

Hamilton Square

232 Pavonia Avenue

Jersey City, NJ 07302

201.435.8000

 

SILVERMAN and Hamilton Square Condominium Association present: An Unreliable Narrator: Paintings by Barbara Friedman, curated by Enrico Gomez. 

 

For her solo exhibition, "An Unreliable Narrator", contemporary artist Barbara Friedman offers new works from her "Strange Bedfellows" series of paintings, a series that engages familiar protagonists from children's literature and popular culture. The narrative framework employed by Friedman serves as one among many entry points through which to delve deeper into these multi-layered works. Traversing the demarcations between representation and abstraction, story and sensorial aesthetics, the artist utilizes the associations of her chosen forms as readily as yet another color on the palette, eschewing simple categorization of these rich and chromatic works. Though relatively new, the paintings on view within "An Unreliable Narrator" contain a wide array of subject matter and tone, and include qualities that are in keeping with earlier series from this prolific painter. Vibrant glowing undertones, keen color relationships, and deft combinations of paint application (blurring, scumbling, scraping, blending) form a sort of signature, a few of the identifiable markers of this artist's varied and masterful lexicon. 

 

The artist progresses through her constructions, building and changing her motifs intuitively, each series of works developing as a sort of dialogue between Friedman, the works themselves, art historical references, & inspiration. Shares the artist, "most of the moves I make in my paintings ... happen organically, through the process." It is this organic process of altering, enhancing, and painting over older works that gave rise to the Gulliver and Gumby forms at their outset. Taken together with a third protagonist, classic fictional marionette Pinocchio, the characters on view in this series foreground a few of the artist's current conceptual and worldly concerns.

 

The title "An Unreliable Narrator" refers, of course, to literature and those moderately reliable characters fitting this description throughout history including, Twain's Huckleberry Finn, Nabokov's Humbert Humbert, Ellis' Patrick Bateman, and Swift's satirical classic Lemuel Gulliver. A work that has an “unreliable narrator” compels the reader to second-guess the information they are given, to view as suspect any “truth” or claim of veracity on the part of the main storyteller, a work of fiction becoming doubly so. 

The presence of the hyperbolic Gulliver, the physically malleable Gumby, and the occasionally mendacious Pinocchio in these artworks implies a sort of lingering remembrance of the early lessons of these childhood antiheroes. With a painterly bravura and in bright colors, these figures once again point to a sort of fantastical limbo, somewhere between fantasy and reality, fact and fiction, a timely underscoring of the verisimilitude and all too relevant biases inherent in any dissemination of experiential "reality", anecdotal or otherwise.

 

Like any great work of art, these paintings exist on multiple levels, the formal, the conceptual, and of course individually as unique vehicles of storytelling. As with any great tale, well executed in vivid strokes and in bold particulars, there is still plenty of space for the viewer to investigate, to second-guess, to color in & flesh out the shapes & lines within, & like the artist before them, make these stories indelibly their own.

 

Barbara Friedman is an artist based in New York City and professor of art at Pace University. She has exhibited widely, with thirty-five solo shows, most recently at Buddy Warren Gallery in New York, NY (2016); BCB Art in Hudson, NY (2015); Ober Gallery in Kent, CT (2014); Ethan Petitt Gallery in Brooklyn, NY (2014); the Painting Center (2012); and twice at Michael Steinberg Fine Art in New York, NY (2007, 2009).  Earlier solo exhibitions were at Art Resources Transfer, The Queens Museum, and White Columns (all NYC); Carnegie-Mellon University, Cleveland State University, the Roanoke Museum of Fine Arts, and the Dana Wright Gallery in San Francisco among others.

Reviews of Friedman’s work have appeared in the New York Times, the New York Sun, The Irish Times, Newsday, Art in America, ARTS Magazine, and Artweek. A group of her paintings were selected for the 2007 issue of New American Paintings, and another group for the 2010 issue.

 

The exhibition is open to the public during normal business hours and by appointment and will be on view at Hamilton Square through August 27th, 2017. For further information, please visit us at SILVERMAN or call number (201) 435-8000. Hamilton Square is located at 232 Pavonia Avenue in Jersey City, NJ.

 

An Unreliable Narrator: Paintings by Barbara Friedman is the sixth exhibition that artist/curator Enrico Gomez will organize for SILVERMAN. For additional information on the exhibiting artist Barbara Friedman, please visit: barbarafriedmanpaintings.com. For additional information on the curator, please visit: enricogomez.com and thedoradoproject.com.

 

SILVERMAN has presented the works of Michael Steinbrick, Jeanne Tremel, Eliot Markel, Debra Drexler, Mark Van Wagner, Rob Ventura, Robert Hendrickson, Sarah Becktle, Kati Vilim, Mark Dagley, Candy Le Sueur, Ed Fausty, Anna Mogilevsky, Ali Harrington, Sara Wolfe, Anne Percoco, Shauna Finn, Melanie Vote, Paul Lempa, Fanny Allié, Michael Meadors, John A. Patterson, Charlotte Becket, Roger Sayre, Karina Aguilera Skvirsky, Tom McGlynn, Margaret Murphy, Valeri Larko, Tenesh Webber, Glenn Garver, Jennifer Krause Chapeau, Michelle Doll, Tim Heins, Megan Maloy, Laurie Riccadonna, Thomas John Carlson, Tim Daly, Ann Flaherty, Scott Taylor, Jason Seder, Sara Wolfe, Beth Gilfilen, Andrzej Lech, Hiroshi Kumagai, Victoria Calabro, Asha Ganpat, Darren Jones, Ryan Roa, Laura Napier, Risa Puno, Nyugen E. Smith, Amanda Thackray, and Kai Vierstra, among others.

 

Directions:

Hamilton Square is located at 232 Pavonia Avenue, in the scenic Hamilton Park neighborhood of Jersey City. Surrounded by tree-lined streets and attractive brownstones, Hamilton Square is located just blocks from the Holland Tunnel, the Light Rail, the Pavonia-Newport PATH Station, and the Grove Street PATH Station — making it an easy destination from anywhere in the greater Manhattan and North Jersey areas, with just a swipe of your MTA card!

 

To reach us from Newport PATH Train Station:

Access Journal Square-bound PATH Train at 6th Ave & 32nd, 23rd, 14th, 9th, and/or Christopher Streets in Manhattan, disembark at Newport Stop (1st stop in NJ). Walk through Newport Mall and exit through doors (by McDonald’s) on first floor, cross through parking garage to Marin Boulevard. Cross Marin (at firehouse) and walk west on 8th street. At Erie Street turn Right and we are a few steps on the left (west) side of street at Pavonia. We are on Pavonia Ave, north of a construction site and flanked by Smith & Chang Coffee Shop and Hamilton Park.

To reach us from Grove Street PATH Train Station:

Access Newark-bound PATH Train at WTC Oculus Hub in Manhattan, disembark at Grove Stop (2 stops). Walk up Newark Ave, turn Right on Erie Street, and walk north a few minutes until Pavonia Ave. We are on Pavonia Ave, north of a construction site and flanked by Smith & Chang Coffee Shop and Hamilton Park.

On-street and metered parking is available. 

(PATH Train to Grove Stop: PATH Trains from WTC, 33rd, 23rd, 14th, 9th, and Christopher St)

(PATH Train to Grove Stop: PATH Trains from WTC, 33rd, 23rd, 14th, 9th, and Christopher St)


Mar
2
Mar 5

M E N Gallery at Art On Paper 2017

Katherine Di Turi, L'ambiente Moderno III, 2014, Giclee print, Edition of 5 + 1 AP, 11 x 8 inches

Katherine Di Turi, L'ambiente Moderno III, 2014, Giclee print, Edition of 5 + 1 AP, 11 x 8 inches

M E N GALLERY AT ART ON PAPER

M E N Gallery will exhibit works on paper by several artists who have exhibited with The Dorado Project including Jarrod Beck, Katherine Di Turi, Karl England, and Teresa Moro in Booth A8 at the Art on Paper Fair (299 South Street - Pier 36, New York, NY) during New York City Armory Week

Katherine Di Turi

Jarrod Beck

Karl England

Teresa Moro

Exhibiting with artists from MEN Gallery, Gallery Molly Krom, and PROTO Gallery:

Jon Campbell

Catherine Haggarty

Sanda Iliescu

Francois Ilnseher

Sofia Quirno

Raymond Saá

Catalina Schliebener

Elizabeth Velazquez

Rob Ventura

Ian White Williams

Downloadable VIP Passes HERE:

Art On Paper 2017: Thurs March 2: 6-10pm / Fri March 3: 11-7pm / Sat March 4: 11-7pm / Sun March 5: 12-6pm at 299 South Street - Pier 36, New York, NY

MEN Gallery is:

Molly Krom
Enrico Gomez
Nick De Pirro

Jan
18
Apr 30

Shared Gaze, Uncommon Vision : Paintings by Jeanne Tremel and Eliot Markell

Image Credit: Eliot Markell, Mist at Schoodic (detail), 2011, plein air watercolor and oil pastel on paper, 9 x 11.5 inches and Jeanne Tremel, Schoodic #1 (detail), 2011, plein air watercolor on paper, 6 x 8 inches.

Image Credit: Eliot Markell, Mist at Schoodic (detail), 2011, plein air watercolor and oil pastel on paper, 9 x 11.5 inches and Jeanne Tremel, Schoodic #1 (detail), 2011, plein air watercolor on paper, 6 x 8 inches.

SILVERMAN and

The Hamilton Square Condominium Association

presents

 Shared Gaze, Uncommon Vision • Paintings by Jeanne Tremel and Eliot Markell

 January 18th, 2017 – April 30th, 2017

Opening Reception: Wednesday Jan 18, 2017, 6-8pm

Catalogue Release & Closing Brunch: Sunday April 23rd 1-7pm

 

Hamilton Square

232 Pavonia Avenue

Jersey City, NJ 07302

201.435.8000

SILVERMAN and The Hamilton Square Condominium Association presents “Shared Gaze, Uncommon Vision • Paintings by Jeanne Tremel and Eliot Markell,” curated by Enrico Gomez.

Artists Jeanne Tremel and Eliot Markell offer a glimpse into their respective art practices, spanning the disciplines of painting, drawing, sculpture and craft with a broad selection of paintings on canvas and works on paper in “Shared Gaze, Uncommon Vision”.

Focusing predominantly on “plein air” (in open air) works, the show also includes a collection of non-representational works, underscoring the abstraction inherent in all aspects of the observed and recorded world.

 

En Plein Air Painting, or the practice of painting out of doors, typically occurs in nature and includes the landscape as a subject matter. This genre of art includes paintings that are created through direct observation and enjoys a long tradition within the history of art. From the iconic swaying wheat-fields of Vincent Van Gogh to the broad vistas and epic grandeur of the Hudson River School Painters, artists have long taken their inspiration from the wild and a “hands on” or “brush-with-nature” exploration of it. Markell and Tremel are no exception.

 

With many years experience observing and interacting with nature, Eliot Markell offers a wide array of landscape paintings, many created on the rugged Schoodic Peninsula of coastal Maine. Home to the Acadia National Park, this area of Maine offers breathtaking intersections of rocky ledges, sweeping sky, and tumultuous sea.

The area is peppered with sleepy fishing villages and stoic inlets that have inspired many an artist including a forbear to Markell, the American modernist Marsden Hartley (whose Maine works from the lobstering village of Corea, where Tremel and Markell have also painted, will be on view at the Met Breuer Museum this coming March).

 

In the same way that the fishing towns and human lives seem interlaced with the natural environs in this bucolic part of the country, so too do Markell’s paintings seem fashioned partly by nature, partly by force of intention, and partly through a cooperation with the nature of his chosen materials, be they oil, canvas, watercolor or paper. There is a rough-hewn quality to these works, which is in keeping with the enigmatic tones of the Coastal Maine surround. While finished and complete unto themselves, the paintings take on the suggestions of their inspiration; jagged, atmospheric, roiling, and alive with a moving stillness. These are works that, not unlike the terrain itself, are revealed in correspondence to the viewer’s exploration of them.

 

For “Shared Gaze”, Jeanne Tremel offers work from both her plein air series and her abstraction series, affirming a certain breadth of her creative inquiry as well as highlighting the shared element of non-representation and translation present in both modes of working. The typical assumed viewpoint within landscape painting is centered out and away toward the horizon line; it is a universal point of human orientation, locus of intention, and marker of the visual tension between sky and earth.

Tremel subverts this vantage point slightly and casts her gaze downward toward the rocks, tide pools, and microcosmic worlds that lay just under our feet and perhaps, just below our day-to-day consideration. This subtle shift brings us into a deeper consideration of the individual components of the environment; boulders, swirls of sea grasses and patches of lichen writ in daubs of watercolor and strands of watercolor pencil on paper.

These examinations of the observed world also reveal a few of the artist’s structural art making predilections; composition, an interest in the mechanics of inter-relation, and the aesthetics of intuitive perambulations and introspection.

 

Veins of these qualities run throughout Tremel’s work and it might be said that while her plein air paintings suggest looking downward, her abstract works suggest looking inward, toward self or source. Like a snapshot or a blueprint of thought, these abstractions dazzle and hum with syncopated and synaptic networks of line, shape, color, and light. In jewel tones and umber sediments, Tremel’s paintings are an exemplary model of the artist in concert and conversation with her materials over time.

In these pieces, intention and will meets exploration and curiosity, “feeling” meets documentation and the work itself partners in it’s own making, unfolding, building and revealing itself along the journey.

 

This idea brings us full-circle back to a consideration of the plein-air pieces. While all artwork is created within a spectrum of time (a few moments to several years or longer), works that are created “out of doors” carry a host of unique additional challenges to the artist including changing light, variable and volatile environmental conditions (rain, clouds, wind) and the random inclusion or potential interruptions from on-lookers or animals or both.

The pressure of these factors on the artist to act quickly and decisively can result in a particular freshness, producing an economy of stroke and expression unique to this genre of artwork that is both practical and it’s own form of visual haiku. The works of Markell and Tremel share these qualities and other attributes as well; works that are formed yet remain open, are complete yet seemingly still evolving, determined yet flexible and exploratory.

 

Though not initially relevant to an understanding of each artists work, it bears mentioning that the artists, in addition to sharing visual inspirations also share an art studio and a life together as spouses. The art world has many examples of individually accomplished artists who are also couples; O’Keeffe and Stieglitz, Krasner and Pollack, Mehretu and Rankin, among others.

While Tremel and Markell each maintain their own course of rigorous inquiry, their practices and interests have overlapped and impressed upon one another over time. Like the shadow-free oak and cypress trees of Kahil Gibran’s moving treatise “On Marriage” these artists continue to grow together with ample space between each other’s practices to continue surveying and enjoying the view.

 

Jeanne Tremel is a visual artist who has shown her works throughout the NYC area, particularly in Brooklyn, many US cities, and in Germany. Born in Minneapolis, her formal art education began at St. Cloud State University, Minnesota (BFA) and continued in Chicago at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (MFA). Later, at the School of Visual Arts in NYC, she earned a Certificate in Art Therapy. Her work has been reviewed in The New York Times, Time Out New York, and featured on many art blogs, such as Left Bank Art Blog, Artefuse, Two Coats of Paint, Gallery Travels, and Mockingbird. She was recently (November, 2015) interviewed about her work for The Huffington Post. She considers herself an abstract painter at heart, switching between oil and mixed media flat work and sculptural wall & floor pieces, and installations, all made of collected materials. Jeanne has lived in Brooklyn for over 20 years.

Eliot Markell was born in Boston, Massachusetts and studied fine arts at Empire State College, SUNY and Mark Hopkins College. After studying with his mentor, Gandy Brodie at Gandy Brodie School of Fine Arts in Newfane, Vermont, Eliot then moved to Brooklyn where he has lived and made art for over 40 years, maintaining studios in Gowanus, Williamsburg and Bushwick. He has also been a presence in the arts community of Northeast Harbor, Maine having shown his plein-air work for many years at Wingspread Gallery and other Maine coast galleries. Eliot has also written art criticism and articles for his blog, White Elephant on Wheels, many appearing in Painter’s Table, a noted online daily art magazine and co-curated group shows. His artworks have appeared in numerous exhibitions in Manhattan, Brooklyn, Jersey City and other US cities.

 

Link to the Blurb catalogue, beautifully arranged and designed by the artists HERE

 

 

 

The exhibition will be on view at Hamilton Square through April 30th, 2017. For further information, please visit us at SILVERMAN or call number (201) 435-8000. Hamilton Square is located at 232 Pavonia Avenue in Jersey City, NJ.

 

“Shared Gaze, Uncommon Vision • Paintings by Jeanne Tremel and Eliot Markel” is the fourth exhibition that artist/curator Enrico Gomez will organize for SILVERMAN. For additional information on the exhibiting artists please visit: for Jeanne Tremel, jeannetremel.virb.com/art and for Eliot Markell, eliotmarkell.com For additional information on the curator, please visit: enricogomez.com and thedoradoproject.com.

 

SILVERMAN has presented the works of Debra Drexler, Mark Van Wagner, Rob Ventura, Robert Hendrickson, Sarah Becktle, Kati Vilim, Mark Dagley, Candy Le Sueur, Ed Fausty, Anna Mogilevsky, Ali Harrington, Sara Wolfe, Anne Percoco, Shauna Finn, Melanie Vote, Paul Lempa, Fanny Allié, Michael Meadors, John A. Patterson, Charlotte Becket, Roger Sayre, Karina Aguilera Skvirsky, Tom McGlynn, Margaret Murphy, Valeri Larko, Tenesh Webber, Glenn Garver, Jennifer Krause Chapeau, Michelle Doll, Tim Heins, Megan Maloy, Laurie Riccadonna, Thomas John Carlson, Tim Daly, Ann Flaherty, Scott Taylor, Jason Seder, Sara Wolfe, Beth Gilfilen, Andrzej Lech, Hiroshi Kumagai, Victoria Calabro, Asha Ganpat, Darren Jones, Ryan Roa, Laura Napier, Risa Puno, Nyugen E. Smith, Amanda Thackray, and Kai Vierstra.

(PATH to GROVE St stop: PATH Trains from WTC, 33rd St, 23rd St, 14th St, 9th St, and Christopher St)

(PATH to GROVE St stop: PATH Trains from WTC, 33rd St, 23rd St, 14th St, 9th St, and Christopher St)

Nov
2
Feb 26

Debra Drexler • Venus Rising

Debra Drexler, Chromatic Utterance (detail), 2015-16, acrylic and oil on canvas, 48 x 60 inches

Debra Drexler, Chromatic Utterance (detail), 2015-16, acrylic and oil on canvas, 48 x 60 inches

SILVERMAN

and

The Majestic Theatre Condominium Association

presents

Debra Drexler • Venus Rising

November 2, 2016 – February 26, 2017

Opening Reception: Wednesday Nov 2, 2016, 6-8pm

Artist Talk and Walkthrough: Sunday Nov 6, 2016, 2-4pm

The Majestic Theatre Condominiums

222 Montgomery Street

Jersey City, NJ 07302

201.435.8000

 

SILVERMAN and The Majestic Theatre Condominium Association presents “Debra Drexler • Venus Rising,” curated by Enrico Gomez.

 

Debra Drexler is a mid-career, abstract painter and exceptional contemporary artist based both in New York and Hawaii. With compositions that include roiling and tempestuous abstractions, Debra Drexler imbues her works with a sense of the emotive and the elemental that tautly hold the viewers gaze through the many passages of their make-up. Drexler is a working artist who maintains art studios in both New York City and Oahu, and her work is informed and inspired by her unique bi-coastal experience. Her art translates the inner experience into outer form through a vigorous and athletic painterly process. Spanning the scale spectrum from intimate to substantial, Drexler’s oil on canvas meditations are a paean and a record of the physical dance that is involved in their making. Created in part on the walls and on the studio floor, her paintings give the viewer a sort of choreographed road map of creation; entreating them to visually step, spin and flow along with the pigments in these many-layered treasures.

 

Says the artist, “My work is particularly concerned with issues of abstraction in contemporary art and its ability to make the invisible visible. My paintings have explored interruptions, which bend the concept of time and space. Working with abstract space in a manner that is reminiscent of the space of the Baroque, I often add a disruptive element, which deconstructs and flattens and suggests another reading of space.”

 

This additional element within the composition might be an inset complimentary-colored paint band, or a cluster of texture here and there across the painted field. This play within the various techniques of abstraction, serves to underscore the artist’s interest in abstraction as both a language and a mission. Concerned with the intersection of the physical and the spiritual, Debra Drexler’s works seem a perfect example of the tension between the seemingly paradoxical qualities of both the physical and the spiritual; transcendent and concrete natures shared by most inhabitants on this physical plane. The artist shares, “I paint to speak to our essential nature. Preparing my mind and body to paint are part of my daily ritual. I practice meditation followed by yoga each morning, so I can approach the canvas empty of everything but my relationship with the paint. The luminosity, which is created through multiple layers of glazes, reflects the refraction of inner light into experience.”

 

On the subject of her works trajectory and development from figurative and narrative in nature to the purely abstract, the artist writes, “My work has gradually transitioned from the narrative to move into an investigation of pure paint. “Gauguin’s Zombie” my first one-person show in New York at White Box Annex (2005) toured from Honolulu Museum. By the time I exhibited “Shadow Play” at HP Garcia Gallery, New York in 2009, the archetypal narrative elements of shadow and tree were overtaken by the quality of paint itself. In my work I often glaze up to 30 layers of paint, creating both depth and luminosity. A review of “Shadow Play” by Michael Carter for A Gathering of Tribes states: “Like the most powerful abstract paintings of the last century, reproductions can only provide a crude chart of her stratagem; the luminosity of the oils themselves, along with their deft application can really only be truly appreciated in person.” Paint speaks its own language.”

 

Debra Drexler has had 30 solo exhibits and over 100 group exhibitions at galleries and museums in New York, Hawai’i, Australia, Berlin and across the United States. Recent New York solo exhibits include: Van Der Plas Gallery, Pool Art Fair, Chelsea Hotel Blue Mountain Gallery, HP Garcia Gallery and Java Studios Gallery. In addition, Drexler has exhibited in group shows in New York including Van Der Plas Gallery, The Drawing Center, Denise Bibro Gallery, Exit Art, Art Finance Partners, and Stephan Stoyanov Gallery, and Sideshow Gallery. Her shows have been covered by publications including Artweek, New York Arts Magazine, and New Art Examiner. Debra Drexler is also a Professor of Drawing and Painting at the University of Hawai’i, and is co-curator with Liam Davis, of “New New York”, a survey of contemporary abstract painting shown at University of Hawai’i Gallery in October-December, 2015, and is traveling to The Curator Gallery in New York in February, 2016. She has curated exhibits in New York including at The Lab of Rogersmith Arts, as well as in Hawai’i and Australia.

 

The exhibition will be on view at The Majestic through February 26th, 2017. For further information, please visit us at SILVERMAN or call number (201) 435-8000. The Majestic is located at 222 Montgomery Street in Jersey City, NJ.

 

“Debra Drexler • Venus Rising” is the third exhibition that artist/curator Enrico Gomez will organize for SILVERMAN. For additional information on the exhibiting artist Debra Drexler, please visit: debradrexler.com. For additional information on the curator, please visit: enricogomez.com and thedoradoproject.com.

 

SILVERMAN has presented the works of Mark Van Wagner, Rob Ventura, Robert Hendrickson, Sarah Becktle, Kati Vilim, Mark Dagley, Candy Le Sueur, Ed Fausty, Anna Mogilevsky, Ali Harrington, Sara Wolfe, Anne Percoco, Shauna Finn, Melanie Vote, Paul Lempa, Fanny Allié, Michael Meadors, John A. Patterson, Charlotte Becket, Roger Sayre, Karina Aguilera Skvirsky, Tom McGlynn, Margaret Murphy, Valeri Larko, Tenesh Webber, Glenn Garver, Jennifer Krause Chapeau, Michelle Doll, Tim Heins, Megan Maloy, Laurie Riccadonna, Thomas John Carlson, Tim Daly, Ann Flaherty, Scott Taylor, Jason Seder, Sara Wolfe, Beth Gilfilen, Andrzej Lech, Hiroshi Kumagai, Victoria Calabro, Asha Ganpat, Darren Jones, Ryan Roa, Laura Napier, Risa Puno, Nyugen E. Smith, Amanda Thackray, and Kai Vierstra.

(PATH to GROVE St stop : PATH Trains avail from WTC, 33rd St, 23rd St, 14th St, 9th St, and Christopher St)

(PATH to GROVE St stop : PATH Trains avail from WTC, 33rd St, 23rd St, 14th St, 9th St, and Christopher St)

Oct
20
Oct 23

The Dorado Project at Exchange Rates 2016

The works of Arthur Bruso and Raymond E. Mingst proudly presented by The Dorado Project.

The works of Arthur Bruso and Raymond E. Mingst proudly presented by The Dorado Project.

The Dorado Project is pleased to announce its participation in Exchange Rates 2016 and proud to exhibit the exceptional works of both

 

Arthur Bruso

and

Raymond E. Mingst

 

at

 

The Buggy Factory

14 Kossuth Place

Brooklyn, NY 11221

(J train to Kosciuszko stop)

 

On View Oct 20 – 23rd, 12-6pm daily

Opening Reception: Fri Oct 21st, 6-9pm

Exchange Rates / Sluice_ Micro Talks: Sun Oct 23rd, 3-4:30pm

(including 10min talks from Christopher Stout, Enrico Gomez, Alex Jeronymides-Norie, Andreas Backoefer, Anders Qvist Nielsen, Ben Street)

 

Exchange Rates, an international expo of collaborative exhibits by dozens of artist-run spaces, is produced by Centotto, Theodore:Art and London-based Sluice_. During this event, galleries and art spaces in Bushwick will share exhibition space and work together with artist-run projects or galleries visiting from outside NYC and abroad.

 

More info on Exchange Rates 2016 can be found here: http://sluice.info/er2016.

 

The Dorado Project will be exhibiting with Grey Cube Projects (Bogotá, Colombia), 12ø (London, England), and PROTO Gallery, (Hoboken, New Jersey). The curators and artists involved with these four artist-run projects will take over the exhibition space of The Buggy Factory from 20-23 October 2016. Their collaborative exhibition will be on view from 12-6pm daily.

 

The Buggy Factory • 14 Kossuth Place, Brooklyn NY 11221 (J Train to Kosciuszko stop)

 

Oct
1
Oct 2

Faraway, So Close; curated selections from Bushwick and abroad.

Anna Kiljunen, Untitled, 2015, oil on wood, 14 x 11 in.

Anna Kiljunen, Untitled, 2015, oil on wood, 14 x 11 in.

The Dorado Project and The Buggy Factory

in celebration of Bushwick Open Studios 2016

 

proudly presents

Faraway, So Close;

curated selections from Bushwick and abroad.

October 1, 2016 – October 2, 2016, noon – 6pm

Artists Brunch Reception: Sunday Oct 2, 2016, 11-3pm

 

The Buggy Factory

14 Kossuth Place

Brooklyn, NY 11221

info@thebuggyfactory.com

 

Artist/Curator Enrico Gomez, in conjunction with The Dorado Project and The Buggy Factory, is pleased to present "Faraway, So Close; curated selections from Bushwick and abroad.” Featuring works by:

 

James Angel

Dasha Bazanova

Adam Brazil

Justin Micah Jacobson

Anna Kiljunen

Eric Mavko

Daniel Morowitz

 

In celebration of Bushwick Open Studios 2016, The Buggy Factory will host a sampling of greats from nearby artists interspersed with artworks from creators located just outside the geographic demarcations of this universal conversation. This sun-filled, historic carriage house will be installed with works that, at first pull, seemed like core emblems of the amazing talents on offer from these seven artists. Further looking revealed several shared or simpatico through lines including a varied exploration of the human form, a focus on vibrant and lustrous color, and an interest in the tactile qualities of their chosen materials. The title, taken from the Wim Wenders art house cinema classic, alludes to art's gentle ability to permeate membranes of separation, establishing connection and inspiration independent of distance, time, or space. ... oh yeah, and angels. There were angels in the film and as it happens, we’ve also a few.

 

A Brunch Reception will be offered for the exhibiting artists and visiting public on Sunday, Oct 2nd from 11am - 3pm.

 

The Buggy Factory

14 Kossuth Place

Brooklyn, NY 11221

J train to Kosciusko

 

Open Saturday and Sunday, noon-6pm

Brunch Reception, Sun Oct 2nd, 11am - 3pm

J Train to Kosciusko

Sep
9
Jan 2

Current Drifter • Paintings by Mark Van Wagner

Mark Van Wagner, Hula Lasso (detail), 2016, natural and pigmented sand, polymer glue and gesso on canvas, 60" x 48"

Mark Van Wagner, Hula Lasso (detail), 2016, natural and pigmented sand, polymer glue and gesso on canvas, 60" x 48"

 

SILVERMAN and

Hamilton Square Condominium Association

presents

Current DrifterPaintings by Mark Van Wagner

September 9, 2016 – January 2, 2017

Opening Reception: Friday Sep 9, 2016, 7-9pm

 

Hamilton Square

232 Pavonia Avenue

Jersey City, NJ 07302

201.435.8000

SILVERMAN and Hamilton Square Condominium Association presents “Current Drifter • Paintings by Mark Van Wagner,” curated by Enrico Gomez.

New York artist Mark Van Wagner creates abstract and expressionistic paintings with pigmented and natural sand. Utilizing a broad range of subtle earth tones and dramatic color, Van Wagner employs and expands upon the textural dimension of this most primary and plentiful of human building blocks, the earth itself.

Sand, an elemental component of the paintings assembled here, plays a number of key roles within this artist’s makings. Foremost among these is the role of “medium”, as sand is the main expressive vehicle within the works presented.  This granular material replaces the more traditional oil or acrylic utilized by so many contemporary painters. Through mixture with pigment, glue and additional media, Mark Van Wagner builds up the layers of accreted media into finely textured and boulder-like surfaces; abstractions impressive in scale and impact.

Constructed largely atop stretched canvases configured horizontally, Van Wagner's paintings share the considered and meditative character of traditional Tibetan and Native-American Sand Painting as well as the bravura and frenetic spatter of works by Mitchell, Pollock and other Modern greats. Underscoring the Buddhist spirituality of the paintings, the artist adds that he recognized “sand to be the most literal medium to capture material decomposition - its essence defining impermanence related to place and gross matter."  Here we see the conceptual implications of building with beach sand; its traces of sea salt, calcium carbonate and quartz linking this earthly material to all carbon-based life forms and to the star stuff of the universe at large. Comprised of multiple painted gestures within delineated rectangular arenas, the paintings also reference sand-boxes (the childhood locus of creativity), human portraiture, or blocks of unformed clay, shot through with loping lines of color-filled possibility.  A close examination of the surface reveals inclusions of sea-worn detritus (bits of plastic, pebbles of ocean glass, splinters of driftwood).  The contrast between pictorial cues of visual depth and actual, bas-relief dimensionality within the painting is only one example among many of the paradoxes that make Van Wagner's artwork so compelling.

The dualistic tensions found within the paintings seep also into the shows title, "Current Drifter”. Gently guiding the viewer to some of Van Wagner's long standing concerns, the word "Current" of course, refers to temporality as well as to the active flow of water and energy that are a tidal constant; bringing sand, wood, and the element of surprise with some regularity. Culled from beaches as far apart as Hawaii and Long Island, Van Wagner's sand is a marker of a process that works in conjunction and partnership with the natural world and local environs.  The “Drifter” portion of the title might refer to any bits of material (wood, leaves, ocean refuse) found drifting atop the watery currents … some of which will find their way into the artist's work. "Drifter" may also refer to that perfect release that enables our human creativity, the Zen-like exhale and mindfulness so integral to intuitive art making strategies.  Here again we come full circle to paradox; a show title and respective works that indicate both the spiritual float of inspiration with the ebb and flow of directional intention. Like castles along the surf, elaborate and evolving in formation, these works remain a play between substance and impermanence, hinting at the inevitable and recursive return of all forms to source. 

Mark Van Wagner (b. 1959, New York, NY, United States) is an artist who is currently engaged in a series of works utilizing sand as his primary medium. The artist references the medium to early childhood play in the sand box and the beach as well as its explicit references to decomposition. Van Wagner received his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Art from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1982. He has since exhibited in numerous venues across the U.S. including Transform Gallery (New York, NY), Proto Gallery (Hoboken, NJ), Randolph Street Gallery (Chicago, IL), Jamestown Art Center (Jamestown, RI), Studio Vendome (New York, NY), Name Gallery (Chicago, IL), Elisa Contemporary Art (Riverdale, NY), and Providence Art Center (Providence, RI) among many others. He has exhibited at the art fairs; Art Hamptons (Bridgehampton, NY) and Affordable Art Fair (New York, NY) and has been covered by various media outlets including Chicago Tribune, Artsy.net, Artdaily.org, and NPR radio among others. His work is included in the collection of the Rockford Art Museum (Rockford, IL). The artist currently lives and works in the Long Island village of Bellport, NY.

The exhibition will be on view at Hamilton Square through January 2, 2017. For further information, please visit us at SILVERMAN or call number (201) 435-8000. Hamilton Square is located at 232 Pavonia Avenue in Jersey City, NJ.

“Current Drifter : Paintings by Mark Van Wagner” is the second exhibition that artist/curator Enrico Gomez will organize for SILVERMAN. For additional information on the exhibiting artist Mark Van Wagner, please visit: markvanwagner.com. For additional information on the curator, please visit: enricogomez.com and thedoradoproject.com.

SILVERMAN has presented the works of Rob Ventura, Robert Hendrickson, Sarah Becktle, Kati Vilim, Mark Dagley, Candy Le Sueur, Ed Fausty, Anna Mogilevsky, Ali Harrington, Sara Wolfe, Anne Percoco, Shauna Finn, Melanie Vote, Paul Lempa, Fanny Allié, Michael Meadors, John A. Patterson, Charlotte Becket, Roger Sayre, Karina Aguilera Skvirsky, Tom McGlynn, Margaret Murphy, Valeri Larko, Tenesh Webber, Glenn Garver, Jennifer Krause Chapeau, Michelle Doll, Tim Heins, Megan Maloy, Laurie Riccadonna, Thomas John Carlson, Tim Daly, Ann Flaherty, Scott Taylor, Jason Seder, Sara Wolfe, Beth Gilfilen, Andrzej Lech, Hiroshi Kumagai, Victoria Calabro, Asha Ganpat, Darren Jones, Ryan Roa, Laura Napier, Risa Puno, Nyugen E. Smith, Amanda Thackray, and Kai Vierstra.

(PATH to GROVE or NEWPORT stops : PATH Trains from WTC, 33rd St, 23rd St, 14th St, 9th St, and Christopher St)

(PATH to GROVE or NEWPORT stops : PATH Trains from WTC, 33rd St, 23rd St, 14th St, 9th St, and Christopher St)

Jul
14
6:00 pm18:00

Rob Ventura • Les Fleurs du Mal

Rob Ventura, Les Fleurs du Mal, 2016, oil, beeswax, and oil pastel on canvas, 35 x 40"

Rob Ventura, Les Fleurs du Mal, 2016, oil, beeswax, and oil pastel on canvas, 35 x 40"

SILVERMAN and Majestic Theatre Condominium Association presents

Rob VenturaLes Fleurs du Mal 

curated by Enrico Gomez

July 14, 2016 - Oct 30, 2016

Opening Reception: July 14, 2016, 6-8pm

Majestic Theatre Condominiums Gallery

222 Montgomery Street

Jersey City, NJ 07302

201.435.8000

Emerging artist Rob Ventura offers large and medium scale works on canvas that explore the intersection between formalist pictorial strategies and the post-modern concerns of visual passage in a digital age. His paintings are typically rendered in oil on canvas and consist of stained glass like petals of color, layered and leafy across dense pictorial fields. These jewel-toned compositions structurally read as collage or geographic mapping with a sense of light that seems to emanate from behind. This quality of being “back-lit” has as much in common with paper based watercolor and printmaking as it does with traditional paint on canvas and the artist brings this multi-disciplinary sensibility to the works assembled here.

Ventura’s all over compositions manage a successful tension between vibrant color and twilight tonalities, veering toward the duskier gradations of the color spectrum. Says the artist, “I’m invested in the darker side of contemporary culture; notions of pleasure/pain, authenticity, sensuality, decadence and the existential quest for meaning.” Taken from the seminal 19th century collection of poems from Charles Baudelaire “Les Fleurs du Mal” (The Flowers of Evil) the shows title points toward the paradoxical concerns to be found within Baudelaire’s poems and to a visual degree within Ventura’s paintings; ideological aspiration vs. sensorial reality, modern progress vs. traditional truism, existential possibility vs. nihilistic pessimism.

Other forms within Ventura’s works include a dense system of patterning partnered with expansive fields of color that speaks to the digitization of contemporary life, the congested quality of urban environments and the mapping of informatics terrain. But there is nature within this expression as well. Environmental shapes like foliage or feathers populate these canvases, albeit in an abstract way. Rubies and sapphire shards seem suggested, and almost twinkle and catch fire among the darker expanses.

The conflation of natural and man-made forms here finds an apt match in the poetry of Baudelaire who wrote,

“I saw a swan that had escaped from his cage

That stroked the dry pavement with his webbed feet

And dragged his white plumage over the uneven ground.

Beside a dry gutter the bird opened his beak,

Restlessly bathed his wings in the dust

And cried, homesick for his fair native lake …”

The tension between differing but mutually present subject matter within Ventura’s paintings can be drawn out to his art historical interests and influences as well. Says the artist, “I think these paintings have a digital quality and belong to the information age, but at the same time are classical and quite conservative. My interest is in the late stages of post-modern culture and its genealogical relation to early Modernism and Existentialism in the 19th Century.” Indeed, like a Tarantino directorial mash-up, Ventura pulls and transcends pictorial cues from his Abstract Expressionist and Color-Field forebears like Helen Frankenthaler, Clyfford Still, Mark Rothko and Jackson Pollock. He retains a color sensitivity thoroughly rooted in the now. Tonal variations in his works, like Instagram filters, offer subtle and slight modifications within his painted particulates, challenging the cursory glance and holding the eye for passages that are rich in rewards to the patient and committed viewer.

Taking inspiration also from artist Cy Twombly’s Peonies series, Rob Ventura’s floral forms, abstracted and transfigured here, highlight the irony and beauty of this iconic subject, blossoming/peaking in its own decay. With pops of color and glinty shapes of resonant hue, the paintings in “Les Fleurs du Mal” are, in the artist’s words, “dark with a haunting quality” yet ultimately arc toward the optimistic, finding form within the void, radiance amidst shadow.

Rob Ventura (b. 1989, Perth Amboy, NJ, United States) is an emerging artist who is best known for making abstract paintings that are reminiscent of digital culture. Through a process-oriented approach he paints, in oil on canvas, facsimiles of vectorized images composed in Photoshop. The resulting works investigate the relationships between post-war abstraction, media culture, and cyberspace. Ventura received his Masters of Fine Arts with honors from Boston University's Painting and Drawing program in 2013. He has since exhibited in New York City at Signal Gallery and Freight + Volume, in California at The Los Angeles Center of Digital Art and in New Jersey at Proto Gallery, Hoboken. He currently lives and works in the New York metropolitan area. Included in the public collections of Boston University and Sovereign Bank he has been covered by NJ.com, HMAG and Boston Art Underground.

The exhibition will be on view in The Majestic Theatre Condominiums Gallery from July 14, 2016 - October 30, 2016. For further information, please visit us at SILVERMAN or call (201) 435-8000. Majestic Theatre Condominiums Gallery is located at 222 Montgomery Street in Jersey City.

“Rob Ventura • Les Fleurs du Mal” is the first exhibition that artist/curator Enrico Gomez will organize for SILVERMAN. For additional information on the exhibiting artist, please visit: robventura.com. For additional information on the curator, please visit: enricogomez.com and thedoradoproject.com.

SILVERMAN has presented the works of Robert Hendrickson, Sarah Becktle, Kati Vilim, Mark Dagley, Candy Le Sueur, Ed Fausty, Anna Mogilevsky, Ali Harrington, Sara Wolfe, Anne Percoco, Shauna Finn, Melanie Vote, Paul Lempa, Fanny Allié, Michael Meadors, John A. Patterson, Charlotte Becket, Roger Sayre, Karina Aguilera Skvirsky, Tom McGlynn, Margaret Murphy, Valeri Larko, Tenesh Webber, Glenn Garver, Jennifer Krause Chapeau, Michelle Doll, Tim Heins, Megan Maloy, Laurie Riccadonna, Thomas John Carlson, Tim Daly, Ann Flaherty, Scott Taylor, Jason Seder, Sara Wolfe, Beth Gilfilen, Andrzej Lech, Hiroshi Kumagai, Victoria Calabro, Asha Ganpat, Darren Jones, Ryan Roa, Laura Napier, Risa Puno, Nyugen E. Smith, Amanda Thackray, and Kai Vierstra.

Jun
3
Jun 12

What Remains

The Dorado Project at

The Buggy Factory

proudly presents

Claudia Sbrissa, Void IV, 2016, digital photograph, dimensions variable.

Claudia Sbrissa, Void IV, 2016, digital photograph, dimensions variable.

 

What Remains

June 3rd – June 12th, 2016

 

The Dorado Project at The Buggy Factory presents What Remains, a grouping of three artists, Bert Benally, Antonia Perez, and Claudia Sbrissa, who are engaging themes of legacy and inheritance, be it personal, cultural or ecological, within their own art making. Contributing to and expanding upon these concerns through their own inquiry and undertaking, the artists of What Remains offer site-specific installation and sculpture, crocheted wall-mounted works and Navajo sand painting in the context of an 18th century 2 story exposed brick carriage house in the heart of Bushwick, Brooklyn.

 

Visiting Info:

Exhibition: What Remains

Opening Reception: Friday June 3rd 6-9pm

Closing Brunch: Sunday June 12th, 1-6pm

Dates: June 3rd – June 12th, 2016

Location: The Buggy Factory, 14 Kossuth Place, Brooklyn, NY 11221 (J train to Kosciuszko St or M train to Central Ave) www.thebuggyfactory.com

Regular Hours: Saturday and Sunday 1-6pm

Cost: free

More Info: (917) 921-5879, thedoradoproject@gmail.com, info@thebuggyfactory.com

 

Artists: Bert Benally, Antonia Perez, Claudia Sbrissa

 

Statement:

We are not the first … and ideally, we will not be the last. In art, as in life, the unfolding and progression of ideas and concerns in many ways rests on the foundation of that which came before … while at other times, a pushing against previous convention and norm, though occasionally chaotic and destructive, can give rise to opportunity and possibility where once it might have seemed there was none. Through the personal to the creative, there is always some thing, some form or object or idea that came before … vestiges of yesterday that can inform and influence still if only we allow them. In What Remains three visual artists; Bert Benally, Antonia Perez, and Claudia Sbrissa, bring their individual and varied practices, rife with concerns of legacy and inheritance, together in the history-laden Buggy Factory; a re-purposed 18th Century two-story brick carriage house in Bushwick, Brooklyn. In ways personal, cultural, and ecological, the concerns carried by these three artists assert that the past is not so much prologue as an active and contributing collaborator in the present, forever shaping that which is yet to be.

 

Built upon a foundation of his own Navajo culture and Native American tradition, artist Bert Benally employs contemporary art making strategies while simultaneously honoring and expanding the legacies and inherited lexicon of his tribal visual forms. Intending his work to speak first and foremost to the Diné, the people of the Navajo Nation, Benally straddles multiple ocular worlds and pulls from his personal experience and cultural custom as readily as engaging tropes of Modern and Post-Modern art making practice. One of his goals, among many, would be that of communicating to his elders while also creating something that hasn’t been seen before. The artist brings this commitment to a series of sand paintings, to be executed in situ, which will exhibit both traditional form and the multivalent concerns of contemporary urban life and it’s lingering impact on the larger environment. The inherent capacity of this art-making material to break down over time fits conceptually into an inquiry of how original intention is read over time, even as it decomposes over time.

 

Through re-purposing the cast-offs of contemporary society, artist Antonia Perez transforms our collective detritus and re-frames notions of value, art worth, and planetary impact within her varied and vibrant art making process. Perez crochets plastic grocery bags and re-purposes empty tissue boxes into new and engaging forms, from wall-mounted tapestries to freestanding sculpture and more. With an interest in textile design and the visual patterns of domesticity, the artist imbues worth into the formerly value-less, presenting the viewer with an opportunity to re-engage with the ubiquitous, left over objects of the day to day in new and unexpected ways.

 

Artist Claudia Sbrissa’s practice spans many disciplines including installation, drawing, sculpture, and photography to name a few.  Coming from a family of artisans, Sbrissa mines a personal and familial legacy of engaging materiality and time-based labor, bringing this tradition to the call and response dynamic of site-specific installation. Through fiber, gold leaf, concrete and other media the artist both conceals and highlights long-standing forms within The Buggy Factory’s structure. Sbrissa also intervenes into hollow shapes along the structures interior wall where floor joists formerly held up what might have been a hayloft or 2nd floor storage area. By foregrounding and giving three-dimensional shape to these voids, the artist reactivates an original overlapping space wherein industry, design and intention once conspired in service to this larger contextual whole.

 

About The Dorado Project

The Dorado Project is a New York / North New Jersey-based project space and compendium of select local, national, and international contemporary art. With a focus on emerging artists and innovative works, The Dorado Project seeks to unearth and weigh the very best of arts’ rich reserves. The Dorado Project: mining art, sharing gold.

 

About The Buggy Factory

A hidden jewel of history and place, The Buggy Factory is a lovingly restored and appointed 18th Century Buggy Factory and Barn, located in the heart of Bushwick, Brooklyn, one of New York City’s rising centers of creativity and culture.  Obscured from street view, The Buggy Factory combines soaring exposed brick walls, 1,600 square feet of floor space, complete privacy and access, with pools of multi-directional ambient light from six chapel-like windows and four generous skylights.  The transportive effect of this setting combines the ambiance of yesterday and the potentiality of today, suspending and softening one’s sense of place.  Lose your self and find The Buggy Factory; a location with possibilities as unlimited and timeless as enterprise and imagination itself.

Expand and Flourish Among New Acquaintances
May
14
Jun 12

Expand and Flourish Among New Acquaintances

EXPAND AND FLOURISH AMONG NEW ACQUAINTANCES

Jarrod Beck
Bert Benally
Tommy Coleman
Lauren Collings
Judith Farr
Nick Fusaro
Rachael Gorchov
Catherine Haggarty
Raymond Saá
Sofia Szamosi
Diane Tenerelli-June
Austin Thomas
Denise Treizman
Ian White Williams

Curated by Enrico Gomez and Nick De Pirro

April 30, 2016 to May 29, 2016

EVENTS

OPENING RECEPTION

April 30, 2016 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM

VISITS

The gallery is open to the public
Sunday to Tuesday
10:00 AM to 4:00 PM or by appointment

ECCO DOMUS
May
13
Jun 26

ECCO DOMUS

The Exhibitions Program at Art House, in cooperation with The Dorado Project, proudly presents Ecco Domus from May 13 to June 26, 2016. Guest curator Enrico Gomez presents a selection of artworks from nine local, national, and international artists; Abdolreza Aminlari, Joy Curtis, Katherine Di Turi, Karl England, Emily Hass, Teresa Moro, Jeremy Coleman Smith, Kirk Amaral Snow, and Krista Svalbonas, engaging themes of replication, recombination, and repetition as found within the framework of architectural inspiration.


OPENING RECEPTION: Friday, May 13, 2016, 6:00 to 9:00pm (sneak preview 5-6pm)

Krista Svalbonas, Migrants 22, 2014, pigment print and collage on board, 14 x 14"

Krista Svalbonas, Migrants 22, 2014, pigment print and collage on board, 14 x 14"

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

contact: Raymond E. Mingst 201-659-5771 or gallery@arthouseproductions.org

 

The Exhibitions Program at Art House, in cooperation with The Dorado Project, is pleased to present

ECCO DOMUS

May 13 to June 26, 2016

The Exhibitions Program at Art House, in cooperation with The Dorado Project, proudly presents Ecco Domus from May 13 to June 26, 2016. Guest curator Enrico Gomez presents a selection of artworks from nine local, national, and international artists; Abdolreza Aminlari, Joy Curtis, Katherine Di Turi, Karl England, Emily Hass, Teresa Moro, Jeremy Coleman Smith, Kirk Amaral Snow, and Krista Svalbonas, engaging themes of replication, recombination, and repetition as found within the framework of architectural inspiration.

 

Listing Info: 

EXHIBITION: Ecco Domus
OPENING RECEPTION: Friday, May 13, 2016, 6:00 to 9:00pm
DATES: May 13 to June 26, 2016
LOCATION: Art House, 136 Magnolia Avenue, Jersey City, NJ 07306 (PATH Train to Journal Square, exit mezzanine level at Summit Avenue)
REGULAR HOURS: Tuesdays to Fridays, 4:30pm to 7:30pm; Sundays, noon to 3:00pm
COST: Free
MORE INFO: 201-659-5771www.arthouseproductions.org [e] gallery@arthouseproductions.org

 

The Artists: Abdolreza Aminlari * Joy Curtis * Katherine Di Turi * Karl England * Emily Hass * Teresa Moro * Jeremy Coleman Smith * Kirk Amaral Snow * Krista Svalbonas

 

Curatorial Statement: 

The exhibition title Ecco Domus combines the Middle English spelling of the word "echo" with the Latin word for "house", referring to the exhibiting artists proclivity for riffing, amalgamation and homage with regard to architectural interest, be it in vernacular scaffolding, modernist structure, or interior design. The Middle English and Latin source points of the title also nod to the origins of western language itself, metaphorically linking the etymological roots of communication with the foundations of the structures examined here. Though each of these artists have highly specialized and individual aims that in many ways span and exceed the thematic parameters proposed in the show, they all share an interest in and usage of "the built environment" somewhere within the development of their own aesthetic constructions. 

Western art and Western architecture, positioned with sibling orientation and in similar dynamic, have been mutually influential from antiquity. Ancient Egyptian and Greco-Roman edifices, like the sculpture and painting of the same era, reflect and elucidate the religious and civic ideals of their time. Thusly, architectural imagery made its way into pictorial art from as early as 30 B.C.E., as evidenced in the beautiful and elaborate frescos depicting ancient Roman cityscapes and domestic interiors unearthed in the Villa Boscoreale, near Naples, Italy. Other art historical treasures featuring architectural representation would include Jan van Eyck's "The Anolfini Portrait", "The Annunciation" by Fra Angelico, and Johannes Vermeer's atmospheric interior and figure study, "Young Woman with a Water Pitcher". The architectural interior as a subject found later champions in Matisse, Vuillard and more comparatively recently in the works of Hockney, Hopper, and Wyeth. 

With advances in the craft and stability of building materials giving rise to adventurous new forms and more ambitious urban planning, so to have changes in the development of towns and cities influenced and shaped the way artists construct and reflect their own realities, filtered through the inspirations and artistic concerns of their day. Trace the Modernist love notes of O'Keefe and Stieglitz to the Radiator Building and the Flatiron Building respectively through to the Precisionist paintings of Demuth and

Sheeler, landing finally at the seminal interventions of Gordon Matta-Clark, wherein buildings themselves are carved into and cut apart to create the "anarchitectural" material of this artists making. 

In Ecco Domus the exhibiting artists continue this fine and storied tradition of responding to the built environment, in considered and deeply personal ways. The show offers works that engage the viewer within three primary areas of architectural subject: the interior, the exterior, and the structural. These primary concerns combine with the multi-tiered interests of each artist in collectively simpatico yet individually unique through-lines corresponding, of course, to subjective aesthetic and material choices.

Artist Abdolreza Aminlari's photographs of light on exterior walls takes a quintessential photographic subject (light) and reduces it to its primary essence. These works allude to Minimalism, the "white cube" of the gallery, and the artists own predilection for negative space. This constructed play between exterior/interior, positive/negative, and subject/object is key to accessing one of many passageways into this artists undertaking. 

Brooklyn-based sculptor Joy Curtis casts and re-casts forms from commercial interiors (cornices and molding) appropriating easily overlooked architectural features and reframing them in a context rife with chance and intuition as much as planning and design. The relationship of the constructed surround to human is flipped from that which shelters and facilitates to an expression which confronts, commanding attention and directing movement around rather than within. 

The photographic works of Caracas/London-based Katherine Di Turi blur the lines between cultural artifact, commodity, and documentation. In her Giltwood Mirrors Series, Di Turi juxtaposes found auction house catalogue images of antique mirrors to an actual mirror, and documents the image once more. Here reflection and repetition obfuscates the demarcations between original and copy, drawing questions on art as gesture, on the tangible and intangible worth of art as object, and on the fun-house vicissitudes of an impressionable secondary art market. 

The art practice of London-based Karl England, in one particular body of work, centers around copies of copies of an original drawing of an architectural element (a desk/drafting table). Though his original visual rumination has long since passed from primary consideration, like a game of "Telephone", the particulars of this story morph through multiple retellings. England reconfigures and embellishes/reduces his visual subject matter from memory, foregrounding questions regarding the structural integrity of recall, design and intention. 

New York-based artist Emily Hass engages history, materiality and the impermanence of memory within her Exiles series, a body of work utilizing and reconfiguring "archival architectural plans of Berlin buildings owned and occupied by Jews and other persecuted artists and intellectuals of the 1930's." With gouache and found vintage paper, Hass renders abstract segments of larger building plans, alluding perhaps to the often contrary relationship between implied architectural stability and longevity and transient human ideas of belonging and place. 

Madrid-based artist Teresa Moro focuses on the incidental, found still-life arrangements of furniture in temporal, human-made environments; waiting rooms, museum lobbies, art fair booths. In focusing on the design elements of these "clonal" backdrops, the artist frames the absent body and its attendant accouterments as a locus for the exchange of culture, commodity, service, and experience. These ongoing series cull the "mise en scene" of differing locations, refuting value-based notions of exclusivity and uniqueness. 

With regard to architecture, Jersey City-based artist Jeremy Coleman Smith takes homage and reproduction to its logical and encompassing end. Using the ephemeral materials of our cast away society; corrugated cardboard, paper, tape and foam, Smith replicates objects of the domestic interior in painstaking detail highlighting the contradictions between notions of artisanal craft and provisional packaging, sentimental heirloom and ergonomic utility. Bringing his background as a cabinetmaker to his fine art practice, Smith focuses our attention on the minutia of detail and aestheticism underlying and evident in our everyday surround. 

Kirk Amaral Snow, a Baltimore-based artist, offers a few selections from his ongoing series which takes vernacular architecture as its inspirational starting point, reflecting and reframing the design and aesthetics of the functional, the local and the performative aspects within systems of support. With a decidedly minimalist slant, Snow inverts the networks of infrastructure and exposes the inherent poetry in building skeletal underpinnings. His work revels in the paradoxical relationship between purpose and time, highlighting the successes and failures of intention divorced or tweaked from original context. 

Chicago-based artist Krista Svalbonas has a practice that incorporates a wide variety of media, including photography, painting and installation. Svalbonas' work visually conflates disparate architectural forms; barn sidings with high-rises, or forgotten housing plans of yesteryear with current dwelling developments. These iconic geometric forms read part letterform character and part records of intention and formal aspiration. Floating, enigmatic and engaging, these shapes signify something decidedly less

stoic and sedentary than their original designs, perhaps the tension between the idealized promise and mortal challenge extant in any human edifice.

One would be hard-pressed to find an area of concern, outside the necessities of food, recreation, and personal artistic development, that occupies the minds of artists more than that of space, specifically the acquisition of space within which to create. From the fluctuating inventories of affordable studio space to the uncertain availability and openness of galleries within which to show ones work, the changing dynamics of the real estate and economic markets have made a great impact on artists and

the scale and pace with which they can create. The real estate product, mainly architectural buildings and the partitioned rooms therein, is a ubiquitous context for most people in modern urban centers, and equally so for creatives. Sudden and unexpected changes to this context, for example the devastating real estate crash of 2008, can affect the art market and artists in myriad ways from lost art sales to gallery closures and more. Interestingly, the word economy comes from the Greek oikos, meaning house, implying a symbiotic relationship of interdependence and exchange for all bodies under a common ceiling. The interrelationship between the seemingly disparate fields of politics, science and money affect the fields of art and architecture in related ways, and this has been true from the very beginnings of Western culture. 

Whether looking to the designs of the past, or highlighting the oft-missed sublimity of the architectural present, the artists in Ecco Domus repeat, riff and utilize these inspirations as actual material; framing and crafting new structures, breaking down the masonry divides between the known present and unknown future limits of what these forms might ultimately convey. 

- Enrico Gomez, curator

 

About Art House

Art House Productions, Inc. is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) organization founded in late September 2001 by writer and actress Christine Goodman. Art House began as informal gathering of poets and community members in direct response to the tragedies of September 11th. At that time, there were no consistent performance venues for artists in Jersey City to meet one another and share new work. Art House's inaugural event sprung from the desire to connect a devastated community through art and dialogue. 

Art House Productions has grown since its inception and has significantly influenced the advancement of the arts community, acting as one of the major pioneering forces for the arts in Jersey City. This expansion of activity and programming necessitated internal growth as well, and in 2007 Art House Productions became incorporated and filed for nonprofit 501(c)(3) status. In late 2007, the organization was presented the Key to the City and an official Proclamation for its outstanding contributions to the City of Jersey City, NJ. Art House Productions inspires, nurtures and promotes the arts in our community through accessible, multi-disciplinary initiatives. 

 

About The Dorado Project

The Dorado Project is a New York / North New Jersey-based project space and compendium of select local, national, and international contemporary art. With a focus on emerging artists and innovative works, The Dorado Project seeks to unearth and weigh the very best of arts' rich reserves. The Dorado Project: mining art. sharing gold. 

 

About The Curator

Enrico Gomez is an artist, curator and art critic based in the New York City area. He received his B.F.A. in Art with a concentration in Drawing from Arizona State University and has exhibited at various venues including Visual Arts Center of New Jersey, Summit, NJ, The Painting Center, New York, NY, Odetta Gallery, Brooklyn NY, Pop Up Art Shop Baranquilla, CO, Van der Plas Gallery, New York, NY, Pentimenti Gallery, Philadelphia, PA, The Mesa Contemporary Arts Center, Mesa, AZ, P.S.122 Gallery, New York, NY, Momenta Art, Brooklyn NY, and The Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art, New York, NY. He has been featured in various publications including The New CriterionHyperallergicArt F City, The L Magazine, Brooklyn Magazine, and The New York Times. Founder and Director of The Dorado Project; an artist-run, project space & contemporary art compendium based in New York / North New Jersey, he is also the co-founder of both the former Parallel Art Space and Camel Art Space in Queens & Brooklyn respectively. The monthly art critic for WAGMAG Brooklyn Art Guide he is also a contributing writer for esse: art + opinions. In 2014 Brooklyn Magazine named him one of the 100 Most Influential People in Brooklyn Culture. 

 

Made possible in part by funds from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts/Department of State, A Partner Agency of the National En- dowment for the Arts; administered by the Hudson County Office of Cultural & Heritage Affairs/Tourism Development, and by the County of Hudson, Thomas A. DeGise, Hudson County Executive, and the Hudson County Board of Chosen Freeholders. 

 

For print or web-ready images please contact: 

Raymond E. Mingst, 201-659-5771 or gallery@arthouseproductions.org

 

136 Magnolia Ave JC NJ 07306 arthouseproductions.org 201.915.9911 


Press Release PDF Here

Mar
3
Mar 6

Art On Paper

Rachael Gorchov, Study for Treetops G, 2016, Acrylic on paper, 5.5 x 9"

Rachael Gorchov, Study for Treetops G, 2016, Acrylic on paper, 5.5 x 9"

The Dorado Project with PROTO Gallery at Art on Paper

Jarrod Beck
Bert Benally
Tommy Coleman
Lauren Collings
Judith Farr
Nick Fusaro
Rachael Gorchov
Catherine Haggarty
Raymond Saá
Sofia Szamosi
Diane Tenerelli-June
Austin Thomas
Denise Treizman
Ian White Williams

The Dorado Project with PROTO Gallery is pleased to invite you to visit Booth 121 at Art on Paper, Pier 36, 299 South St, New York, NY 10002. We will be presenting works on paper by some of our favorite artists, under the auspices and as guests of Nick De Pirro and his PROTO Gallery.

VIP Preview: Thursday, March 3, 2016, 6 PM to 10 PM

Public Fair Hours:
Friday, March 4: 11:00am to 7:00pm
Saturday, March 5: 11:00am to 7:00pm
Sunday, March 6: 12:00pm to 6:00pm

The Dorado Project is a New York and New Jersey based compendium of select local, national, and international contemporary art, with a focus on emerging artists and innovative works. Founded and directed by independent curator and artist, Enrico Gomez, the Dorado Project seeks to unearth and weigh the very best of art's rich reserves. 

PROTO Gallery is a contemporary art space located in the historic former R. Neumann and Co. leather goods factory in Hoboken, NJ. Founded by artist Nick De Pirro in 2013, PROTO exhibits new work in all media by emerging and mid-career artists in a 2500 sq. ft. main exhibition space and auxiliary video projection room.

Get Tickets: http://thepaperfair.com/tickets/

Join our Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1667490013499722/


We hope to see you soon!
Enrico Gomez
Director, The Dorado Project

The Dorado Project
321 Newark St. 5th Floor
Hoboken, NJ 07030

 

Oct
15
Oct 18

Sluice_Art Fair 2015

The Dorado Project, featuring artists LeeLee Chan, Paul Simmons, and Frank Zadlo, partners with Square Art Projects at Sluice_Art Fair during London's Frieze Week!

The Dorado Project, featuring artists LeeLee Chan, Paul Simmons, and Frank Zadlo, partners with Square Art Projects at Sluice_Art Fair during London's Frieze Week!

Join us at the historic Bargehouse, OXO Tower Wharf on London's vibrant and cultural South Bank (between the Tate Modern and the National Theatre) at Sluice_2015; the biennial artist-driven "alternative to the traditional art fair" art fair, which boasts 35 galleries and artist-run projects on 5 floors, and includes panel discussions, performances, screenings, and special curatorial projects. Oct 16 - Oct 18th, 2015 from 11 - 6pm. More info at sluice.info

The Dorado Project proudly offers three emerging artists whose exceptional work exists on the forefront of contemporary abstraction. LeeLee Chan, Paul Simmons, and Frank Zadlo all work in both 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional forms, employing a wide range of media including video, drywall, acrylic paint, found object, linen and cement, to name only a few. Diverse, sensitive, intelligent, and engaging, the work of these artists exemplifies The Dorado Project's mission statement; to mine the very best of art's rich reserves and share generously of the gold that is found there. 

VIP & Press Reception : 5 - 8:30pm Thurs Oct 15th

Viewing Hours : 11 am - 6pm Fri Oct 16th - Sun Oct 18th

Info at : sluice.info

 

 

Jun
5
Jun 7

De Colores

  • The Dorado Project at The Buggy Factory

The Dorado Project

at The Buggy Factory • 14 Kossuth Place, Brooklyn NY 11221

The Dorado Project, at The Buggy Factory, proudly presents De Colores, a group art show featuring Inna Babaeva, Andrea Bergart, Jennifer Ditacchio, Ben Godward, Doreen McCarthy, Anne Russinof, and Denise Treizman, which celebrates the myriad attributes and effects of color.

Denise Treizman, See Through, 2014, acrylic, ink, spray paint, correction tape on canvas, 4' 5" x 5' 4"

Denise Treizman, See Through, 2014, acrylic, ink, spray paint, correction tape on canvas, 4' 5" x 5' 4"

Opening Reception: Friday June 5th •  7pm-10pm

On View: Saturday & Sunday June 6 & 7 • noon – 7pm

Sunday Brunch: Sunday June 7 • noon – 3pm

Taken from the Mexican folk song and un-official theme of the United Farm Workers Union, the title alludes to the celebratory and life-affirming qualities of color, expressed within the show along aesthetic lines. The song was employed to unify workers and buoy campesino spirits during protests and long fights for justice. The lyrics include seasonal and environmental references that were readily identifiable, communal, and uplifting and the heartening, stimulating visual characteristics of “the great love of infinite colors” is also soundly evident here.

The artists within De Colores, though coming from multiple individual concerns and practices, share a deep affinity for color and an appreciation for its impression and efficacy. Bands of aqua and white within the paintings of Jennifer Ditacchio connote landscape and movement while layered swaths of gestural and intersecting mark fill the frames of Anne Russinof’s gem-like works.  Like three-dimensional brushstrokes writ large, the inflatable sculptures of Doreen McCarthy posses a keen and contradictory sense of gravity and weightlessness while the works of Inna Babaeva commingle everyday objects, industrial foam and spectral hues to surreal and fantastical effect. Ben Godward’s art, through accretion, offers vivid cues to his creative concerns including gluttony, product marketing and consumerism. With references to fabric design, gestural abstraction and 80’s pop, the paintings of Andrea Bergart gleam with vitality and the multi-disciplinary works of Denise Treizman mix found objects, paint, and a heightened color palette for results that straddle the demarcations between artistic disciplines.

De Colores offers a song of color to kickoff the summer season, to salute the 9th Annual Bushwick Open Studios, and to acknowledge the vibrant talents of seven deeply imaginative and brilliant artists.

This is the second art event at The Buggy Factory which will serve as an official BOS2015 HUB for the 9th Annual Bushwick Open Studios event; one of NYC’s largest arts and cultural events boasting over 500 individual artists studios, galleries, and performances over 3 days, more info at: www.artsinbushwick.org . During the festival, The Buggy Factory will offer free printed maps of the festival, light refreshments, and both an Opening Reception and Closing Brunch for the artists of De Colores and visitors.

The Buggy Factory

14 Kossuth Place

Brooklyn, NY 11221

J train to Kosciuszko St.

www.thedoradoproject.com

info, queries: thedoradoproject@gmail.com

Apr
17
Apr 19

Passing, Left

As an inaugural art event at The Buggy Factory, The Dorado Project is pleased to present Passing, Left , a pop-up group art show which considers the landscape, the humans movement through it’s time-based environs, and the shifting eventualities of terra firma's own aberrant dislocations.

Karen Marston, Massive Waves, 2014 - 2015, oil on linen, 60" x 84"

Karen Marston, Massive Waves, 2014 - 2015, oil on linen, 60" x 84"

Passing, Left

Jennifer Ditacchio, Andrea Sherrill Evans, Kerry Law, MaryKate Maher, Karen Marston, Anna Ortiz, Kathleen Vance

at

The Buggy Factory  •  14 Kossuth Place, Brooklyn NY 11221

April 17 – April 19th, 2015

Opening Reception: Friday, April 17th, 6 – 8pm

On View: Saturday & Sunday, April 18th & 19th, 12 – 6pm

Closing Brunch: Sunday, April 19th, 12 – 3pm.

 

Taking as its inspiration, the buggy; the original product of the show’s historic, 19th century buggy factory/barn location, this show reflects on the human movement of goods and services across land, and the effect of “progress” on the environment. The title Passing, Left, refers at once to the convention of speeding by other travelers in the “fast lane” of our country’s highways as well as the passing of time and to what our collective advancement and the planet’s development trajectory leaves “left” in its wake.

Boston-based artist Andrea Sherrill Evans shows works concerned with human-sourced designations upon the environment; decisions such as where trail markers are placed and which wood is to be used for firewood or building materials, etc. Evans’ practice re-directs the human gesture and re-purposes it with regard to the environment, overlapping the arbitrary and purpose-filled with the generative and the reconciliatory. Artist Kathleen Vance shows works from her “Traveling Landscapes” series; vignettes of natural landscapes fabricated within aging steamer trunks and valises, which reference the human desire for and timelessness of place. These works encompass notions of “the pastoral”, land rights, belonging and province.  MaryKate Maher, an artist based in Bushwick, pulls information from her immediate surroundings as well as from memory/imagination for works that seem to exist in the intersection between the natural and the man-made. Geode rock shapes balance precariously with steel frames and corrugated planes, combining material components in ways that subvert the proto-typical reads of heavy/light, soft/hard, and constant/ephemeral.

The two-dimensional works within the show seem to connote temporal moments during, just before, or just after some great event. The paintings of Kerry Law are time specific and ever changing in that they are generally executed alla prima; direct observation in one session. In his works we see the familiar subjects of landscape truisms; trees, the ocean, sky, but within these still and frozen instances are records of the ever-changing subtleties of nature. Karen Marston, by contrast, depicts scenes of great upheaval and dramatic change within her “Disasters” series; oceanic swells, forest fires, and tornadoes which foreground the inspiring beauty of nature and impact of the larger movements within its oeuvre. The paintings of Anna Ortiz seem to record the moments just after some great natural or man-made occurrence. Concrete slabs, clumps of tree, brick and wood co-mingle in an eerily still space, equidistant between abstraction and reality, and displaying a quietude that belies the violence that the depicted subjects seem to imply.  Jennifer Ditacchio shows works, inspired by nature, that seem to exist in the space between the observed and the imagined, the fantastical and the real.  Here abstract masses seem to float, evoking clouds or islands with an implication of directional movement; less exterior expedition than internal pilgrimage and resolution.

While the creative movements of these artists remain their own, Passing, Left intends to offer at least one position with regard to their work, an opening into a deeper examination of and appreciation for these artists’ endeavors and the myriad of courses and routes they may take to arrive at their singular destinations.

Passing, Left is the inaugural art event at The Buggy Factory and is proudly presented by The Dorado Project.

JustMAD 6: Emerging Art Fair
Feb
24
Mar 1

JustMAD 6: Emerging Art Fair

  • LaSede COAM

JustMAD is an annual art fair, based in Madrid, Spain, that focuses on emerging international art. "Meant to ignite cultural exchange as a long-term commitment, the JustBrooklyn section of JustMAD is an opportunity to bring Brooklyn to the European arena ..." For this, the inaugural venture and first art fair appearance of The Dorado Project, four exceptional Brooklyn artists; Lee Lee Chan, Paul Loughney, Aaron Williams, and Frank Zadlo have been assembled. These artists either live, work, or formerly made their base of operations in Brooklyn, NY and represent a cogent cross-section of the high caliber of art making to be found within this exciting area.  The Dorado Project is appearing under the auspices and rubric of Schema Projects; artist Mary Judge's celebrated Bushwick gallery. The combination of Schema Projects artists; David Ambroise, Nina Bovasso, Scott Espeseth, Robert Otto Epstein, and Mary Judge along with The Dorado Project artists; all showing a diverse array of inspiring works on paper, will make for exciting viewing! We hope that you will join us!

To learn more about JustMAD, visit http://justmad.es/

The Dorado Projects wishes to thank Mary Judge and Schema Projects for this generous opportunity.